Fearless Females – March 13: Moment of Strength – Debra D Griffin

March 13 – Moment of Strength: Share a story where a female ancestor showed courage or strength in a difficult situation.

My Aunt Debra Mitchell Griffin was a very courageous woman.  She fought for her life to survive the attack upon her body.  She was an awesome spirit and you could see hers through the pictures she would take.  She is missed dearly.  When I look at her photo and when I remember her, I envision strength.

 

“I am a Cancer survivor. There is a joy deep in my heart that sings triumphantly and no one can take it away.” ~Debra D. Griffin

Fearless Females Blog Post-March 3-Name and Naming Patterns

March 3 — Do you share a first name with one of your female ancestors? Perhaps you were named for your great-grandmother, or your name follows a particular naming pattern. If not, then list the most unique or unusual female first name you’ve come across in your family tree.

Now most people know me as Yvette Marie (Porter) Moore.  This was the name given to me by my parents when they adopted me.  When I turned 18 years old, I was curious about my birth family, so I contacted the adoption agency requesting non-identifying information.  When I received the papers in the mail, to my surprise, the worker wrote my birth “Given” name in the information.

I was named “Victoria.”  Later on when I did the research of my name through the birth index, I discovered that my name was Victoria Ann Espinoza-Mitchell.  I really liked my birth name, but not enough to change back as I have grown accustomed to who I am.

Because I thought my name was pretty and being sentimental and in a spiritual sense, I decided to name my second and last daughter after me.  She carries my name Victoria Ann Porter.

When I met my birth mother, I learned that my Great Grandmother was named Victoria Ann, and that it was a family tradition.

What a wonderful thing to be able to do…Share my name with my youngest.  What was taken, now is given.

Genealogy When You Are Adopted

A few years ago, I presented “Genealogy When You Are Adopted”  at the 8th Annual Discover Your Roots Conference in Los Angeles and at the San Diego African American Genealogical Research Group. Searching your family roots when you are adopted is difficult to do if your records are sealed and you have nothing really to go on except your birthdate, and where you were born. Each State and county has different rules and regulations as to the access of records. I was born in Los Angeles, CA, and even though the records are sealed, I was successful in reuniting with my birth family.

At a later date, I will share my story.

Genealogy When You’re Adopted Click on name (link) for a larger showing of slide show.

If you are interested in my sharing more as to the process of research in California, let me know.  I can be contacted at sugarhillharlemny@gmail.com

Sympathy Saturday: Johnny Roy Mitchell, Sr.

     Your name, Johnny Roy Mitchell (my birth father) and the few items on this blog post is all I would have had of you, but somehow by the age of 21 you had three other children, my younger siblings whom I have gotten to know and love.  I have no memories of your existence, as the relinquishment papers were signed before I took my first breath.  I searched for you, and couldn’t find you.  You were a brick wall that finally came tumbling down when I found your sister Aunt Debra, may she rest in eternal peace.
     This was the first photo Aunt Debra gave to me of you….A splitting image of my youngest son, Michael.  When I saw this photo, I knew I was your child.
        
     
Johnny Roy Mitchell, Sr.
10 May 1951-14 Oct 1972

   I am not really sure why your life had to end so young, but the newspaper article about your death is what led me to you.  It was like you wanted to be found, and since then my world opened up and my family expanded.

Johnny Roy Mitchell
News Pilot, San Pedro, CA
Pg. A2

      I heard various stories of why you died.  We know it was an overdose, but it was a possible homicide.  The investigation did not go too far, and the decision was made that it was an accident.  We will never really know the truth.  Living the life you led sent you to an early death.  I grieve for you because you became a statistic at a time when it took a prayer and a blessing for  black males in the “ghetto” to make it to 21 without either dying, or living life in prison.  I just hope and pray that you have peace as you slumber into eternity.

Death Certificate Deferred

Final Death Certificate

 

Johnny Sr. and Mary Mitchell

      With the union of Johnny Roy Mitchell and Rosemary Lara (deceased) I was blessed with siblings that I would get to know (Herlinda, Johnny and David) and cherish.  (I had a different mother). I could not imagine my life without them.

David & Me
Our first photo together

Johnny Roy Mitchell, Jr

Herlinda Mitchell & Me

Document Day: Tom Paulette World War I Registration Card

Tom Paulette
My Paternal Great Grandfather
(Photo from Debra Mitchell)

My Great Grandfather Tom Paulette was born on February 17, 1873.  On September 12, 1918, Tom registered and completed a World War I Registration Card.  Tom was 45 years old at the time.  He was living in Schlater, Leflore County, Mississippi with his wife Georgie [Howard] Paulette.  His occupation at the time was that of a farmer.  His employer was R.B. Scheaten.  Tom was of a medium height and slender built.  He had grey eyes and Black Hair.

Tom Paulette was my dad’s (Johnny Roy Mitchell) Grandfather.

WWI Reg Card-Side #1
Ancestry.com
WWI Reg. Card-Side #2
Ancestry.com

Copyright
The material, both written and photographic on these pages is the copyright of Yvette Porter Moore unless stated. Material on this site may be used for personal reference only. If you wish to use any of the material on this site for other means, please seek the written permission of Yvette Porter Moore
© 2010-2011