Designers Inspect Fall Embroidery

Here is another article with my Grandmother Agnes C. Peters inspecting embroidery with some of her other fashion friends.

New York Amsterdam News
August 12, 1950

[Transcribed]

Agnes Peters, Mary Lou Chandler, Annie Grantland and Jean Moore, four well-known person in fashion circles study display prepared by National Hand Embroidery and Novelty Manufacturing Association for Verta Hayes show at Tavern-On-The Green.

 

 

Sponsor Fashion Show: Agnes Cully Peters

Agnes Cully Peters was my maternal Grandmother. She was a fashion designer in New York City. This is one of the many newspaper advertisements/newspaper articles that I have come across.

[Transcribed]

Sponsor Fashion Show:

Fashions of 1951 will be presented Sunday evening, Dec. 17, at Renaissance Ballroom by Madeline’s Beauty Salon and a Committee of Citizens.  The affair is a benefit for the New York Baptist Home For The Aged.

Among the exhibitors will be Mary Lou Chandler, Margaret Pegues Floyd, Agnes Cully Peters, Zelda Valdez, Spencer Flournoy, Arthur Smith, Nele Cuyjet.

*[Zelda Valdez (1905-2001) was also known as Zelda Wynn Valdez.  She was the first African American fashion designer to own her clothing shop in New York City.]

Fearless Females Blog Post: March 22 – This is “Her” Life.

March 22 — If a famous director wanted to make a movie about one of your female ancestors who would it be? What actress would you cast in the role and why?

If  a famous director wanted to make a movie of one of my ancestor’s it would be about the Cully family and it would be centered around my grandmother Agnes and my mother Betty residing in Sugar Hill.  The many lives of the other family members would be weaved through the life of Agnes.  There would be many scenes portrayed in her sewing room in her apartment where many stories were told.  The main years of the movie would be 1923-1952.

I would like to see Cicely Tyson play my grandmother as she is a star actress, and Angela Bassett  would play my mother because of her elegance.  My mother was very elegant.  The name would either be “The Socialite” or “Sugar”

Marian Anderson and her Fashion Designer Agnes Cully Peters

Fearless Females Blog Post-March 4-Marriage Records

Once again, in honor of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month. March 4 — Do you have marriage records for your grandparents or great-grandparents? Write a post about where they were married and when. Any family stories about the wedding day? Post a photo too if you have one. I have not gone beyond finding marriage indexes of my grandparents and great-grandparents. I haven’t had much success with online searches as I believe I will need to order the certificates. I have no wedding photo’s of any grandparent ancestors. I am surprised that there are no wedding photo’s in my possession as my Grandmother Agnes in later years made wedding dresses for many of the who’s who.  What I do have is an insert of my mom’s journal discussing her parent’s union.
The Union of Agnes Mae Cully and Charles Irving Peters

Agnes and Charles fell in love and decided to marry. Mother had a dear friend who lived in Brooklyn, New York.  Her name was Louise Bryant.  Her husband was a composer, Fred Bryant.  They lived in a beautiful brownstone house in Brooklyn. (My father’s home state was West Virginia, so they were both in Florida temporarily.)  When they decided to wed, they agreed they wished to leave the South.  Mother had promised “Aunt” Louise that no matter where she was when she found her true love, she would be married in Louise’s house in Brooklyn, as Mother and Dad bid farewell to people and places in Florida, took the train to Brooklyn and were married in a beautiful ceremony in this lovely, beautifully appointed house. When I was growing up, one didn’t call older people by their first names, so close adult friends became “Aunts and uncles”, as a result, there were quite a few adults whom I addressed and spoke of in this manner, although they were actually not relatives. My mother said her first “inkling” that she was going to have trouble with Daddy was when he took her to Atlantic City for their honeymoon.  Evidently, he put her up in a fine hotel.  It was very romantic for her!  However, when the bill came due, Daddy didn’t have the money to pay it.  In Mother’s fury, she tore the wedding ring off her finger and threw it out the window.  She threw her clothes into her bags and went to the train station, but it was too late to get a train leaving the city.  Feeling totally stranded, she returned to the hotel.The next day, after they made-up, she crawled around in the grass and hunted until she finally found her wedding ring! As punishment for not paying the bill, Mother and Dad had to work out their indebtedness at the hotel.  I don’t know what he did, but she made the beds!

(Copyright 1970-2012 by Yvette Porter Moore, No form of publication without permission given.)

Not so Wordless Wednesday: Agnes Cully Peters’ Fashions in the Newspaper

I am so grateful to ProQuest as they made their African American History available for free during the first half of Black History Month to researchers and anyone interested in exploring their Black History Collection.  This was available a few years ago, and I had the opportunity to collect lots of articles connected to my family.  This year was different as I collected more that had not been in the database from the first time I researched.

I decided for this Wordless Wednesday, I would showcase one of the articles regarding my maternal Grandmother Agnes Mae [Cully] Peters.  I have shared before that she was a fashion designer in the 30’s-50’s in Harlem, New York.  I hope to actually make this into a series to showcase her many newspaper articles as I find them fascinating as the people in the community felt that the events were news worthy.

This is a gown my grandmother Agnes Cully Peters designed and sewed for the Winter Fashions Collection show.  Miss Ruth King was a regular model for Agnes and continued modeling even after my grandmother moved to Los Angeles in 1953.