Not Amanuensis Monday: Betty Peters 1942 -1944 Journal, Final Day

This is a continued effort to transcribe my mother’s 1942 Journal when she was 15 years old.

 

Jan 2, 1944
     So much has happened between last May and today that I can only touch on a very few of the outstanding events.
      Alvaretta came back to New York last fall.  She has been to see us several times.  Her lovely sister is living in the city with her four children.  Alvaretta is now living in Brooklyn with a married couple.



He’s a negro artist and she’s white.  Alvaretta claims to be living in a very cultured atmosphere and is very happy (now).
     Marian Anderson and Razz Fisher are married.  They tied the knot last summer.  It was in all the papers.  We sent them a card of congratulation and called them up.  They sent us a Christmas card.
     June and Palmer have been married for seven months.  The wedding was lovely.  Everything went off as planned, only better.  Moving pictures were taken which I haven’t seen as yet.  Aunt Vi Thompson sent us a photo-…

…graph though.  June went to Florida (where Palmer was shipped) and stayed for a month until he was shipped to North Carolina.  She’s home now.  She and Sis LaVant are both working at Sack’s 34th St. now.  June and I went out to lunch together and she ran out and left me to pay the bill.  How’d you like that?!!
     Richard Timpson and I had a fleeting romance that lasted from June 1943 to about the middle of September.  He ditched me because I was too virginal.  After fooling around with Barbara Franklin (who is one of them things) he was shipped away to Texas because of bad behavior at the New York Army Hall.  He became sick and had….



...to spend some time in the hospital out there but he’s out now.  He used to go around with Arlene Alvaranga and then Agnes Wethers.
    The summer was very warm and pleasant.  I acquired a sunburn whist I still haven’t entirely lost.  Late in August I spent a few days with Hilda (Bonnie) Proctor!  She knocks me out with her “dear lamb” Sonny banks from Boston and Lester.
     She visited me for the Christmas holidays.  Let me say right now that they are the most glorious holidays I have ever spent.  I can really see myself growing up now.  I’m doing so many…

…things now that I couldn’t ever do before.  (I was 17 years old on the 17th of November 1943). 
     We had a big tree for $4.08. Blonnie came X’mas Eve.
     Here are my activities.  (Christmas was on Saturday)
     Friday Night: Cocktails at Aunt Burnette’s house. (Blonnie and I had Pepsi Cola).  Bed about 4:00.
Saturday: 1. Loads of X’mas presents.
2. Dinner with the Family, Aunt Burnette and Uncle Albert, Blonnie, Joyce, Lester.  Ernest Craig, “septical” a hippy jerk from way back came back.
Sat nite: Lester & Hilda smooch while Joyce and I play records.

St. Martin Episcopal Church
230 Lenox Avenue (Malcolm X Blvd)
NY NY

Sunday: St. martin’s Church. Rain! Rain! Rain!  We meet Rev. Johnnie Johnson’s…

…son, David and plan party for Tuesday night.  Later we go to movies (Hamilton). Picture: “Sweet Rosie O’Grady”  Betty Grable, Robt. Young
Monday: We went Ice skating at Iceland (50th St.  I fell down twice.  Mon. Nite: Movies: “The Cross of Lorraine” with Pierre Aumont, Gene Kelly, Richard Whorf *** (in my estimation).
Tuesday: We fool around all day.  Go to David Johnsons party that night with Max and Charlie Yergan.  Nice party, just nice.  Jackie Canton is there.
Wednesday Night: THE COMUS CLUB







My first formal dance.  At the SAVOY.  Maxi Yergan escorted me.  (Is he handsome).  I hope he comes to see me.  I had a ball.  Other’s there were Blonnie, Lester, Barbara, Bobby, Frankie, Dixon (he’s a doll, I just love him), Pat Rainey, Betty Pogue, the fellow with the white streak in his hair, Pat Cuffee and scads of othhers.  What fun!
     A formal dance. Ha!  I’m growing up.  Thursday Blonnie went home.  My house was packed from morn till night with kids.  Friday was New Years.  We kids about 100 of us went first to Barbara’s then Bobby’s.  We carried on!  Had a ball!  Bobby was on furlough from the Navy, Frankie, from…



…the army.  God Bless them and all the others.  I didn’t go to Earl, Stanley, Wallace, Sonny’s party Monday because they didn’t want Blonnie and she was my guest Saturday Night.  Aunt Burnette and Uncle Albert drove Mom, Unk, me up to the Bronx to the Paschall’s new home.  Very nice time had.  When we came home, we went to Grace Thompson’s and ate candy, fruitcake, spareribs, blackeyed peas, drank rockin rye and milk. OW!  This is Sunday and I’m doing trig homework.
    Tommie Owens came over for a piece of cake, (his first time in my house) but it was all gone.  He a darling.  I…



…understand him now.  I love him too.  His friend, “Al”, the other fireman is going away to the Army on January 4 (Tuesday).


Boo! Hoo!  Ruthie and Liela are getting chummy again.


Oh Gee!  I love everybody.  Frankie Touie, Maxie.  What a mixup.  Dear Me!

 

 

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Amanuensis Monday: Thank You Note to a Fiance

I came across a note that I found in a book that I inherited, and had been placed in my bookcase for quite awhile.  The note was dated November 19, 1956.  My parents got married August 18, 1957, so they were either dating or  they were engaged to be married.

2260 1/2 St.
Los Angeles, Calif.
November 19, 1956

My dearest,

I adore you.
Thank you,
thank you,
thank you,
thank you,
thank you,
thank you,

I’ll never forget this birthday if I live to be a thousand, and I shall be yours forever.

Your baby,
 Betty

Copyright
The material, both written and photographic on these pages is the copyright of Yvette Porter Moore unless stated. Material on this site may be used for personal reference only. If you wish to use any of the material on this site for other means, please seek the written permission of Yvette Porter Moore
© 2010-2011

Raymond and Jeanette Cully: Recollections from Betty Peters

Raymond & Jeanette Cully
Photo from Gail Cully Middleton Collection
All Rights Reserved
   

   
     My mother used to tell me stories about her Uncle’s and Aunts (The Cully’s).  She always talked about Uncle Raymond, as she would say Ray was her favorite Uncle.  I am unsure if I met him or not as we lived in California and Ray and his family lived on the East Coast.  My mother was always positive about Uncle Ray.  She shared with me that he was a drummer, and often played alongside his other siblings growing up, as they were all very musically talented.  As adults, he often play with his brother Wendell Culley.


     I  had the opportunity to meet Uncle Ray & Aunt Jeanette’s daughters in New York, (Gail & Karen) and still need to meet their son Raymond, but I know the opportunity will arise.  My goal in my genealogy was to find all the descendants of the ten surviving Great Aunts and Uncle’s and meet them and reuniting our families which have not been together in over 50 to 60 years, even though many of us are not even that age.  I have had much success in locating my cousins, and look forward to meeting them all.  I just wish my mother had lived long enough to meet them also.


     The story below is what was told to my mother by Ray.  My Uncle Ray and Aunt Jeanette married and remained married until Raymond’s death in the 70’s. He definitely loved Jeanette and they have three adult children to show for it.




[Story insert]


     The doorbell rang.  I answered the door.  There stood a small Negro man and a white woman.  The Negro man looked as though he might be Cuban.  He wore a black coat and grey hat. The white woman had on a very cheap, fluffy, white fur coat.  Her much-bleached reddish hair was in a screwy frizz, hanging down from a medium sized hat and touching her shoulders.  Her eyes were very strange.  They were very heavily made up.  The woman grinned.  The man sat down the two suitcases he was holding.


“Are you Betty?”, he asked.


“Yes, I am.”
“well,” he smiled, “I’m your Uncle Raymond, and this is your Aunt Joan!”


….


     Uncle Raymond explained his marriage thusly: He was “gigging” in Albany, (which he described as being a worse place racially than Atlanta, Georgia.)  Jenny (Aunt Joan) was a waitress in the night club where he played.  He and she “got something going”, and she claimed she was madly in love, although for him it was just another temporary romance in the life of a busy traveling musician.
     Since he had not car, he and Jenny used to do a lot of walking around Albany.  Sometimes they would “take a walk.”  Other times they would be coming from or going to some definite place.  Jenny would hold his arm, cast affectionate glances his way and give him occasional little love pats and pinches.  This bothered the townspeople, who complained to the police.
     Uncle Raymond was called down to the police station and told to date his “own kind” and to leave the town’s white women alone.  Uncle Raymond laughed at times and walked Jenny around town more than ever.  He told Jenny what happened and she increased her affection in public, giggling loudly when people stared in apparent disgust.
     Still Uncle Raymond said he was not in love with Jenny.  He was in love with a girl back home who had set him up in the upholstery business in an effort to get him to give up show-business.  To him defying the town with Jenny was fun…nothing more!
     Finally the chief of police had Uncle Raymond picked-up.  Uncle Raymond was taken to the Chief’s private office.  He called Uncle Raymond a nigger, said he obviously didn’t know the “ways” of Albany, and told him if he kept on walking around town with this white woman hanging on his arm they would run him out of town.
     Uncle Raymond was furious!  He screamed at the chief of police..  He left the police station hollering, “I’ll show you!”
     He went straight to a store and bought a wedding ring.  That night at the club he proposed to Jenny.  She was thrilled!
     A short while later, married, arm in arm, they walked right past the police station.  Jenny waved her fingers for all looking out from the building to see her wedding ring.  They stepped into the cab they had waiting, went straight to the train station and left Albany.  Since they had no money, no jobs and could not return to Albany, they came to our apartment in New York.

Copyright
The material, both written and photographic on these pages is the copyright of Yvette Porter Moore unless stated. Material on this site may be used for personal reference only. If you wish to use any of the material on this site for other means, please seek the written permission of Yvette Porter Moore
© 2010-2011

Scrapbook Sunday: Betty Peters Communicants Class Part #2

This is a continuance of My mother’s Scrapbook #1.

My mother Betty Peters (1926-2004) had a really nice red scrapbook that she put together in her Communicants Class;  that included church programs, little booklets of various gospel books of the Bible, news article clippings and things that interested her or were her favorite things.

Every Sunday I will post pages from my mother’s scrapbook & as the pages are falling apart and disintegrating.  The red scrapbook is over 70 years old and she put it together when she was attending St. James Presbyterian Church in Harlem.  It was 1940 and my mother was 14 years old.

Young People’s Day 1940
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America
Front Page
Page 2 & 3 of Program

Young People’s Day
Presbyterian Church in the United States of America
Front Page

Page 2 & 3 of Program

Marian Anderson
My Grandmother Agnes was her Designer for 20 years.

Articles featuring:
Gertrude Elise Ayer &
Justice Jane M. Bolin

Raymond Pace Alexander

Raymond Pace Alexander heads one of the most skillful, best-trained, and successful law firms in America housed in its own office building in the nation’s third city.

 [Transcribed]

ETHEL WATERS IN “MAMBA’S DAUGHTERS” creates, with passion and great artistry, a character that is almost Greek in its capacity for tragedy.  As Hagar, the daughter of Mamba,pursued by the twin Furies of bad luck and wild temper, Miss Waters portrays a woman whose greatest crime is stupidity, whose love for her child runs like a crimson thread through the dark fabric of her life.  Mis Waters’ voice has long delighted Broadway, but in this, her first “straight” part, the wide scope of her acting ability is revealed.  “Mamba’s Daughters,” written by DuBose Heyward and published as a novel in 1929, is dramatized by Mr. Heyward and his wife, Dorothy.  Here, as in all their writing, they explore the gaiety and the despair of the American Negro.  In the dusty country of the Deep South, this pitiful drama of a violent, uncomprehending creature, caught between her instincts and the law, marches to a classic end.

My mother attended this featured program featuring Katherine Dunham.  I remember my mother telling me that she took dance lessons at the Katherine Dunham School of Dance when she was in college.

Katherine was born June 22, 1909 and died May 21, 2006.  She was an innovator in African American Modern Dance.  She was a choreographer, educator, activist, song writer, author and she was an anthropologist.  She combined her love of dance and anthropology throughout her life.

To learn more about Katherine Dunham click on her name.

Back of Flyer

 My mother always took pride in her own people.  When I saw this page of her scrapbook, I had to smile because she always instilled in my brother and I to be proud of who we are, and to know something about the people that paved the way for us.

Black History month in our household growing up was very important.  It really was important all year round.  My parents had us children enrolled in classes to learn about our culture on Saturdays.  We also went through a Rights of Passage with other
African American youth, and we had a ceremony with African dances, poetry, Swahili lessons, and we also learned about various Blacks that made an impact in the lives of our people and to the country.

I also remember my parents holding a Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration in our home every year and we would sit around the living room with neighbors, community members, and family listening to the recording of the March on Washington.  This was always a powerful and uplifting event.

My mother Betty loved Winter Sports.  She loved to Ice Skate and she liked any sport that had anything to do with snow.  When I was growing up, my mother signed my brother Marshall and me up for ice-skating lessons.  It was so much fun and we took lessons for a couple of years, and then it was on to something else.

Whenever the Olympics Winter Sports came on TV or any other time during the year, she would turn to the station and we would watch for hours.

Living in San Diego, I still have had the opportunity as a child to go to the mountains and ski.  So even in our Sunny side of the country, my mother ensured that my brother and I enjoyed and experienced what she did.

MY FAVORITE WINTER


FRICK AND FRACK FROM SWITZERLAND



Frick and Frack were two Swiss skaters who came to the United States in 1937 and joined the original Ice Follies show as comedy ice skaters.

Copyright
The material, both written and photographic on these pages is the copyright of Yvette Porter Moore unless stated. Material on this site may be used for personal reference only. If you wish to use any of the material on this site for other means, please seek the written permission of Yvette Porter Moore
© 2010-2011

Scrapbook Sunday: Betty Peters Communicants Class Part #1

My mother Betty Peters (1926-2004) had a really nice red scrapbook that she put together in her Communicants Class;  that included church programs, little booklets of various gospel books of the Bible, news article clippings and things that interested her or were her favorite things.

I want to take the time every Sunday to go through my mother’s scrapbook & post each page, as the pages are falling apart and disintegrating.  The red scrapbook is over 70 years old and she put it together when she was attending St. James Presbyterian Church in Harlem.  It was 1940 and my mother was 14 years old.

Religion and Spirituality was very important to my mother’s life.  The way she practiced evolved over time.  On various occasions she would discuss the different types of churches she attended and impressed upon me that one’s spirituality is more important than what type of church one was attending.

St. James Presbyterian Church
Mother attended catechism in 1940

Photo Taken by Vanessa Moore June 2010

This Scrapbook is the size of a regular sheet of paper.
I was always intrigued by the cover of this book, and wanted
to know what was inside of it.

[Transcribed]

My Prayer

Thank you dear father,
For our parents so grand,
For our friends true, and loyal,
For our free, happy land,
And may the world soon realize,
With joy, and with mirth,
That nothing is sweeter
Than peace on the earth….Amen

{Original by Betty Peters}

Back inside cover of Scrapbook

[Transcribed]
Betty Peters
460 West 147th Street (mom’s residence)
St. James Presbeteryan Church
Communicant Class
Scrap book

Some of the gospel books in the scrapbook..(The book of John was missing, as I remember losing it years ago…must find.)

St. Mark
St. Matthew
The Shorter Catechism

What is inside the envelope???

Well, let’s see below…

Medical Aid for China (stamps)
I was trying to find information online regarding these stamps, and really didn’t find anything.  In 1940, it was a time of war and upheaval in other countries. Two website’s I found that require further investigation through the archives are: United Service to China Records: 1934-1967 and World Events during the 1940’s .  I will do further inquiry, and if anyone else knows, please contact me.

Our Church

By

Theodore F. Savage

Evangelism

Board of National Missions
of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.
156 Fifth Avenue  New York, N.Y.

9 Reasons Why a Christian
Should be a Church Member

1. Is is an obvious means of confessing Christ.
2. It serves as a wholesome restraint under temptation.
3. It furnishes a stimulus to well-doing.
4. It provides a delightful spiritual fellowship.
5. It makes my example an influence for good.
6. It is a step in the path of obedience which strengthens faith and enriches experience.
7. It is the only way to perpetuate the visible Church.
8. It affords the best facilities for service, giving the advantage of organized effort in Christian activities.
9. As a member of the Father’s family I ought to be in His house, at His table, and openly identified with His work and worship.

Street name changed to:
 Adam Clayton Powell Blvd

 ALL REQUEST PROGRAM

PARKER WATKINS
TENOR

THURSDAY EVENING
MARCH 7th, 1940
AT 8:30 O’CLOCK

AT
SALEM METHODIST CHURCH
129th STREET, 7th AVENUE
NEW YORK CITY

MINISTERS:
REV F.A. CULLEN
REV. J.C. HILL

(Rev. F.A. Cullen was Poet Countee Cullen’s unofficial adopted father.)

(To see details of the program, click on the picture)

Info on Salem Methodist Church  and More info on Salem Methodist

Part #2 of Scrapbook August 28, 2011

Copyright
The material, both written and photographic on these pages is the copyright of Yvette Porter Moore unless stated. Material on this site may be used for personal reference only. If you wish to use any of the material on this site for other means, please seek the written permission of Yvette Porter Moore
© 2010-2011