Fearless Females Blog Post-March 4-Marriage Records

Once again, in honor of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month. March 4 — Do you have marriage records for your grandparents or great-grandparents? Write a post about where they were married and when. Any family stories about the wedding day? Post a photo too if you have one. I have not gone beyond finding marriage indexes of my grandparents and great-grandparents. I haven’t had much success with online searches as I believe I will need to order the certificates. I have no wedding photo’s of any grandparent ancestors. I am surprised that there are no wedding photo’s in my possession as my Grandmother Agnes in later years made wedding dresses for many of the who’s who.  What I do have is an insert of my mom’s journal discussing her parent’s union.
The Union of Agnes Mae Cully and Charles Irving Peters

Agnes and Charles fell in love and decided to marry. Mother had a dear friend who lived in Brooklyn, New York.  Her name was Louise Bryant.  Her husband was a composer, Fred Bryant.  They lived in a beautiful brownstone house in Brooklyn. (My father’s home state was West Virginia, so they were both in Florida temporarily.)  When they decided to wed, they agreed they wished to leave the South.  Mother had promised “Aunt” Louise that no matter where she was when she found her true love, she would be married in Louise’s house in Brooklyn, as Mother and Dad bid farewell to people and places in Florida, took the train to Brooklyn and were married in a beautiful ceremony in this lovely, beautifully appointed house. When I was growing up, one didn’t call older people by their first names, so close adult friends became “Aunts and uncles”, as a result, there were quite a few adults whom I addressed and spoke of in this manner, although they were actually not relatives. My mother said her first “inkling” that she was going to have trouble with Daddy was when he took her to Atlantic City for their honeymoon.  Evidently, he put her up in a fine hotel.  It was very romantic for her!  However, when the bill came due, Daddy didn’t have the money to pay it.  In Mother’s fury, she tore the wedding ring off her finger and threw it out the window.  She threw her clothes into her bags and went to the train station, but it was too late to get a train leaving the city.  Feeling totally stranded, she returned to the hotel.The next day, after they made-up, she crawled around in the grass and hunted until she finally found her wedding ring! As punishment for not paying the bill, Mother and Dad had to work out their indebtedness at the hotel.  I don’t know what he did, but she made the beds!

(Copyright 1970-2012 by Yvette Porter Moore, No form of publication without permission given.)

Fearless Females Blog Post: March 2-Photograph

This is one of my favorite older photo’s of my Great Aunt, Hannah Sidney (Cully) Brown. She was born on December 10, 1891 in Worcester, MA. She was a pianist and Jazz singer. She was the second to the oldest child of the Ambrose & Nora Cully Clan.

I chose Hannah’s photo today because I have always been drawn to her, and my mother always talked about her Aunt Hannah, as she was with her when she died. Hannah died on November 25, 1932 in Jacksonville, Duval, Florida of Breast Cancer and I want to remind all women that we must get our yearly mammograms, and do our monthly self-exams to ensure we are taking the right preventions against Breast Cancer!

Hannah and her sister Zara (who played on the “Jeffersons” the tv sitcom) both married Brown brothers. Hannah was married to Elvin Wesley Brown, who my mother called “Unkie”.

(Fearless Females Blog Post) March 1-Favorite Female Ancestor

Today begins the 1st Day of Women’s History Month!  A month to celebrate the women in our life and those that made a difference in history past and present.

Once again, in honor of National Women’s History Month, Lisa Alzo of The Accidental Genealogist blog presents Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month.

I have decided to participate in the Prompts:  So here we go!

March 1 — Do you have a favorite female ancestor? One you are drawn to or want to learn more about? Write down some key facts you have already learned or what you would like to learn and outline your goals and potential sources you plan to check.

Possibly Jane B. Collins Courtesy of Gail Cully Middleton

I have been passing this photo off as my Great Great Grandmother Hannah D. Nelson Gilliam as I just assumed this was her instead of my Great Great Aunt Jane B. Collins, who is Hannah’s older sister.  This picture came from my cousin Gail’s old photo collection, whose father, Raymond Mansfield Cully Sr. was raised by Jane beginning in 1911 when his mother Nora A. Cully died leaving 10 children behind.

My assumption was because Hannah lived in the Cully home and took care of the children until her daughter died, it had to be her.   The grandmother Hannah died in 1912.  Raymond most likely had in his possession a photo of his Aunt Jane since he spent most of his childhood in her home and cared for her in her elderly years. So, I now believe that this might actually be a picture of Jane B. (Nelson) Collins.  My goal is to research and find out if this is a photo of Jane or Hannah.

My favorite Woman Ancestor that I want to learn more about is Jane B. Collins.  Her slave names were (“Nelson & Ellis”).  Jane was born approximately January 1840 in North Carolina.    Jane was co-habitating with John A. Collins in 1860, and married him officially August 20, 1866 in New Bern, North Carolina.  In the late 1870’s, Jane migrated with her husband, immediate family, extended family, and other migrants from New Bern  to Worcester, MA in the  late 1870’s.

I found Jane listed in the book, “First Fruits of Freedom” (pg. 152) by Janette Thomas Greenwood.  A book about the migration of former slaves and their search for equality in Worcester, Massachusetts, 1862-1900.   She was one of twelve women from the AME Zion Church that organized “The Woman’s Progressive Club, of Worcester, Mass.”  She was active in the political and women movement of that day and a leader in the Black Community of Worcester.

I have found her mentioned in a few news articles coordinating events at the AME Zion Church through the Woman’s Progressive Club.  I would like to know more about her and what impact she had in the migration movement helping and supporting newcomers into Worcester, MA.

I am not sure of how many children Jane had if any.  Her sister’s children are shown as residing in Jane’s home in 1870, with Hannah absent.  I would like to find out her descendant family line if possible.  I would also like to do further document research on Jane by making another trip to Worcester, MA to see if I can confirm that this is a picture of her, and to possibly find her in a directory or newspaper article with her photo.

Jane B. Collins died in September of 1925.  My goal is to order her death certificate so that I have an exact date of death.  I have made a trip to the Hope Cemetery in Worcester and found her headstone along with her husband Joseph.

I am so intrigued by this mulatto, who was born a slave and despite her circumstances became a leader in her church and community.

Sympathy Saturday: Osborne Ambrose & Gertrude Louise [Hayes] Cully

I had been wondering for some time what happened to my (Great Uncle and his wife), Osborne Ambrose Cully and Gertrude Louise Hayes.  They disappeared after the 1930 Census and there were no death certificates or index that I could find online.
 I was told by my cousin Karen Cully, Osborne and Gertrude’s Great Grand-daughter that they both died young and that they left their only child Richard Clayton Cully, Sr. when he was under ten years old.  Since this was at least 20 years before Karen was born, she was not positive to the exact dates.
Recently after searching on Proquest during Black History Month, I came across Osborne’s death notice and Gertrude’s burial notice.  This helped give me closure as to their deaths.
Osborne Ambrose Cully & Gertrude Louise Hayes
August 4, 1918
[Osborne’s Scrapbook]
[Gertrude’s Burial Notice Transcribed]
Aug 22, 1936
The Baltimore Afro-American
Pg. 21
Mrs. Gertrude Cully, Worcester, Mass
Mrs. Gertrude Cully, wife of Osborne Cully of Clinton, Mass, was buried here Saturday.

[Osborne Cully’s Death Notice Transcribed]

Sept 25, 1937
The Baltimore Afro-American
Pg. 23

Osborne Cully
Worcester, Mass-Osborne Cully
died last week at his home near Clinton.

Since I do not have exact dates of their deaths, I can pretty much estimate.  Gertrude was buried on August 22, 1936.  It was customary during this time that my family was buried by the third day, so approximately Gertrude died on August 19, 1936.  Of course I will need to order a death certificate to confirm the date.

Osborne Cully most likely died between September 12 and the 18th of 1937 as the death notice states he died last week and the newspaper was dated on September 25, 1937.  Knowing the proximity of Osborne’s death will allow me to order his death certificate with a lot more ease.

Osborne was born on March 29, 1899 in Worcester, Massachusetts.  He was a master electrician and attended the Boys Trade School graduating top in his class.  Osborne’s parents were Ambrose Elander Cully and Nora Ann Gilliam.

Gertrude Louis Hayes was born on April 22, 1894.  Her parents were Charles A Hayes and Henrietta Gray.

Amanuensis & Mappy Monday: Hope Cemetery Map And My Ancestors Buried There: Part #1

     I prepared a year before taking my trip to Worcester, MA, as I went for the specific purpose of researching and walking in the spirit of my ancestors.  I was pleased with my results even though my research in the cemetery is not complete.  

     The first thing I did was to print out this really cool map of Hope Cemetery and get the address.  On the Hope Cemetery website, I made inquiries to the Friends of  Hope Cemetery as to specific family members that were possibly buried there.  They do an initial search without a fee.
The Hope Cemetery Map helped me locate the gravesites
of my Ancestors once I arrived on the premises.
119 Webster Street, Worcester, MA
(508) 799-1531

 
      It was a very cold and rainy day when my daughter and I went to the Hope Cemetery the first day.  We drove around looking for the basic area of where my ancestors were buried.  We were able to find My Great Grandmother Nora Ann (Gilliam) Cully and her son William E. Cully as their tombstone inscriptions were both written behind the other.  We were unable to locate Nora’s husbands headstone Ambrose E. Cully.  At this point, I figured it might have sunk.  A few feet away, I located Jane B Collins headstone with her husbands name inscribed on the back.  I took some photos but most were accidently lost.

Ancestors Headstones
The first two in the front and across from each other.

 
  On the second day to the cemetery, I went to the cemetery office and inquired about family burial records.  I gave the names of Hannah Gilliam, Jane B. Collins, Ambrose E. Cully, Nora A. Cully and two  male stillborn babies that my Great Grandmother Nora had given birth to.


     Below are the documents that were given to me.  There were other names on the record cards that I had not researched before the trip. 

Section 6767-76
Owner of the Plot: Ambrose E. Cully
Area 108, Paid Nov. 11, 1911 $35
William E. Cully was buried on Sep. 17, 1912 in grave (R F 3).  Nora Ann Cully was buried on Nov. 11, 1911 in grave (R F 2).  Ambrose E. Cully (according to this record was 53.  Not the correct age was buried on May 11, 1925 in Grave (R F 1).

Bottom writing of top card
If you can help with what it says, let me know.

     I tried to interpret what the wording says above.  What I have: F? of L?  B? W? from east side Marker & number on south side

Section 5817-76
Owner: Gilliam, Hannah D. wid Daniel
Perpetual Care: $50
Date May 8, 1905, Price $25


Hannah Gilliam (75) was buried on Feb. 25, 1914, in grave (R F 2).  Sarah A. Moore (60) was buried on Nov. 3, 1909  in grave (R F 1).  Jane Foreman (29) (daughter of Hannah Gilliam) was buried on April 26, 1905 in grave (L F 2)

The last names of the two stillborn infants (Scully) were mis-spelled, should be Cully.  Their grave was a mass grave for babies at the time and it was the generous contribution of a donor that paid for the burials. (Info given by the Hope Cemetery office clerk).
Section  5395-74 P.C. $50 Area 31 1/2
Owner $6  #6909  Paid July 9, 1902
The father of the stillborns were Ambrose E. Cully.  On May 25, 1910 Infant Cully was buried and on July 8, 1902 Infant Cully was buried.  The mother was Nora Ann Cully.  I did not get the opportunity to see the gravesite as I got this information on my second visit, which was a Sunday and did not have time to locate it.

Section 6772-76  Area 117
Owner: Collins, Jane B. widow of Jos. A
Paid $30 on Dec 12, 1911.
Representative: Osborne A. Cully, 504 Wilson Street, Clinton, Mass 1936
Joseph A. Collins (80) was buried on Nov 27 1911 in grave (R F 1). Jane B. Collins (85) was buried on Sep. 14, 1925 in grave (R F 2).  Nora, Cully* (24) was buried on April 1, 1936 in Grave (L F 2).


Note: Reserve L F 1 for Floyd O Cully on order of Osborne Cully.  Notify him of any other burial.


This last card answered some questions for me.  I did not have a death record for Osborne Cully but knew he died young.  I know for sure that he died after April 1936 since his sister Nora Cully died on April 1, 1936.  *Nora Cully was named after her mother Nora as her mother died after giving birth to Nora Jr.  Another interesting fact in this last card is that Floyd O. Cully is not buried at Hope Cemetery in Worcester but a cemetery in Lynn, MA, as he died in later years, and much after his Uncle Osborne Cully.  Floyd O. Cully was Nora A. Cully Jr.’s son.


My relations to each of these ancestors below:


Buried @ Hope Cemetery


Ambrose E. Cully: Great Grandfather
Nora A. Cully: Great Grandmother
William E. Cully: Grand Uncle
Joseph A. Collins: 2nd Great Grand Uncle
Jane B. Collins: 2nd Great Grand Aunt
Nora Cully, Jr.: Grand Aunt
Hannah  D. Gilliam: 2nd Great Grandmother
Sarah A. Moore: No relation documented
Jane B. Foreman: Great Grand Aunt
Cully, Infant #1: Grand Uncle
Cully, Infant #2: Grand Uncle


Mentioned on Burial Cards:


Osborne A. Cully: Grand Uncle
Floyd O. Cully: 1st Cousin 1x Removed
Daniel Gilliam: 2nd Great Grandfather


Hannah D. Gilliam and Jane B. Collins are sisters.
Hannah’s children are: Nora A. Cully, Sr. and Jane B. Foreman


I will be researching the relationship of Sarah A. Moore.  

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