Fearless Females Blog Post – March 15: Six-Word Memoir Tribute

I am on my fifteenth day celebrating Women’s History Month and taking advantage of the Fearless Females: 31 Blogging Prompts to Celebrate Women’s History Month.

I have to thank Lisa Alzo of the Accidental Genealogist blog for presenting such an awesome idea.

March 15 — Write a six-word memoir tribute to one of your female ancestors.

Here are my  Ancestors I am highlighting this day with the six-word memoir.
Betty Mae Peters Porter (My Mother): Educator. Great Humor. Classy Woman. Beautiful.
Agnes Mae Cully Peters (Maternal Grandmother) New York Fashion Designer, Cancer Survivor
Helen Bunn Thompson (Paternal Grandmother) Spiritual. Quilter. Concerned Citizen. Foster Parent.
Nora Ann Gilliam Cully (Maternal Great-Grandmother) Always Pregnant. Pianist. Church-goer. Died Young.
Hannah Singleton-Nelson Gilliam (Maternal Great Great Grandmother) Former Slave. Laundress. Young Widow. Matriarch.
Jane B. Nelson Collins (Maternal Great Great Aunt) Former Slave. Freedom Fighter. Activist. Strong.

Fearless Females – March 14: In The News

March 14 — Newsmakers? Did you have a female ancestor who made the news? Why? Was she famous or notorious? Did she appear in the social column?

I have had many female relatives in various social columns throughout the United States on my maternal side. 

When I was going through my Paternal mom’s scrapbook, I came across this clipped out picture of my grandmother’s sister Hattie Bunn Criner who was born in 1914.  I am unsure as to what magazine this photo was published in, but she seemed to be very happy.  I did not have the opportunity to get to know Hattie, and our encounters were very few.

Apparently she was a housekeeper in her middle ages.

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Fearless Females – March 13: Moment of Strength – Debra D Griffin

March 13 – Moment of Strength: Share a story where a female ancestor showed courage or strength in a difficult situation.

My Aunt Debra Mitchell Griffin was a very courageous woman.  She fought for her life to survive the attack upon her body.  She was an awesome spirit and you could see hers through the pictures she would take.  She is missed dearly.  When I look at her photo and when I remember her, I envision strength.

 

“I am a Cancer survivor. There is a joy deep in my heart that sings triumphantly and no one can take it away.” ~Debra D. Griffin

Fearless Females Blog Post-March 10: Religion

March 10 — What role did religion play in your family? How did your female ancestors practice their faith? If they did not, why didn’t they? Did you have any female ancestors who served their churches in some capacity?

Religion has played a big role in the life of my ancestors.  In the African American Experience, “Religion” and “Church was always central to their daily lives.

My ancestors have been members of various types of churches. Some of them have been African Methodist Episcopal (AME), Zionist AME, Methodist, Presbyterian, Catholic, Episcopalian, Church of Scientology, and various others.

My ancestors not only attended church but they participated in activities under the hospices of the church. Below is an article, with mention of a few of my ancestors.   Jane Foreman (Great Grand Aunt), Zara Culley (Grand Aunt), Mrs. Jane Collins (2nd Great Grand Aunt).  I believe this article was published in the Worcester Spy.  I am unsure of the date of the article, but I believe it would have to be between 1902-1904 as  Jane Foreman died in April of 1905.

They were celebrating Emancipation Day at the Zion Church.

Emancipation Day Celebrated in Zion Church

Fearless Females Blog Post-March 7: Favorite Recipe

Everyday this month, I will do a post on a female ancestor.  Thank you to the Accidental Genealogist for the Post Prompt.

March 7 — Share a favorite recipe from your mother or grandmother’s kitchen. Why is this dish your favorite? If you don’t have one that’s been passed down, describe a favorite holiday or other meal you shared with your family.

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Betty Mae Porter at home being Bartender. About 1972

I really can’t think of any recipes off hand that my mother would use.  She was one of those mother’s that would not measure anything, and would just cook.  Of course she had many recipe books in the home, so I am not sure how much she relied on recipes.

I can tell you one thing for sure, she cooked every night for dinner while I was growing up.  It would be a very rare occasion if she bought anything like fast food.

My mother was an excellent cook!  She always cooked with lots of garlic and onions.  Garlic was on and in everything.

I think my mother improvised quite a bit in the kitchen.  The one thing I miss about her cooking was her soup.  Her soups never tasted the same as the last one she made.  It was always a different variety.  My uncle and dad would call her “Soup Girl.”

She would love to send soup to her friends in the neighborhood, and she would send it home to me and my children.  They loved their Grandma’s soups!